COVID Prevention & Treatment Education for Disabled People

Are you more likely to get sick from COVID-19?

You’re at increased risk for severe illness if you’re…

  • An older adult (50+)

  • Someone with other medical conditions (like weakened immune systems)

  • A pregnant or recently pregnant person

Did you know...?

If you test positive and are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19, treatments are available that can reduce your chances of being hospitalized or dying from the disease. 

You Can Find COVID Treatments by...

  1. Calling a healthcare provider

  2. Using the Test To Treat tool to find a testing location that can provide treatment

  3. Calling 1-800-232-0233 (TTY 1-888-720-7489) to find a testing location that can provide treatment

Medications to treat COVID-19 must be prescribed by a healthcare provider and started as soon as possible after diagnosis to be effective. Contact a healthcare provider right away to determine if you are eligible for treatment, even if your symptoms are mild right now.

How can I be safest from getting sick with COVID?

  1. Some people with disabilities might be more likely to get infected or have a severe illness because of underlying medical conditions, congregate living settings, or systemic health and social inequities. 
     

  2. All people with serious underlying chronic medical conditions like chronic lung disease, a serious heart condition, or a weakened immune system seem to be more likely to get severely ill from COVID-19. Adults with disabilities are three times more likely than adults without disabilities to have heart disease, diabetes, cancer, or a stroke.
     

  3. Get vaccinated. Being vaccinated makes you much less likely to get very sick. Still, some vaccinated people, especially those ages 65 years or older or who have other risk factors for severe disease, may benefit from treatment if they get COVID-19. 

    Already vaccinated? Stay Up-To-Date on COVID Vaccines. As with vaccines for other diseases, you are protected best when you stay up to date.

    Find a COVID-19 vaccine or booster: Search vaccines.gov, text your ZIP code to 438829, or call 1-800-232-0233 to find locations near you.

     

  4. Talk to your doctor about preventative medication. For people who are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19 infection, medications are available that can reduce your chances of severe illness and death. If you are moderately or severely immunocompromised or severely allergic to COVID-19 vaccines, you may be eligible for Evusheld.
     

  5. What is Evusheld

    • An investigational medicine used in adults and children ages 12 years and older. 

    • Consists of 2 monoclonal antibodies provided together to help prevent infection with the virus that causes COVID-19. 

    • A healthcare provider gives Evusheld as 2 separate consecutive intramuscular (IM) injections at a doctor’s office or healthcare facility.
       

  6. Wear a mask.
     

  7. Practice physical distancing. Stay at least 6 feet from people who don’t live with you. Avoid crowds and poorly ventilated spaces.
     

  8. Wash your hands often, and use hand sanitizer made with at least 60% alcohol.​
     

  9. Take a COVID test. If you start having symptoms or have been exposed to someone with COVID, it’s important to test yourself early and often. This helps prevent spreading the virus to others. It also allows you to talk with your doctor about treatment sooner.
     

  10. Want FREE tests mailed right to your door? Sign up here.

How can I prepare for getting COVID?

Unfortunately, even taking all of the steps above does not guarantee safety from catching COVID. And for those of us who are at higher risk, we want to do everything we can to ensure our safety and wellbeing during the COVID-19 outbreak. Here are a few steps you can take to prepare for getting COVID:
 

  1. Familiarize yourself with treatment options.

  2. Create a contact list of family, friends, neighbors and local service agencies that can provide support in case you or your direct support provider becomes ill or unavailable.

  3. If possible, plan at least two ways of communicating that you’re sick with your support systems (family, care workers, providers, etc.) to let them know what you need from home and work that can be used rapidly in an emergency (e.g., landline phone, cell phone, text-messaging, email). Write down this information and keep it with you.

  4. If possible, have a few weeks of household items and groceries in stock so that you will be comfortable staying home for a few weeks.

    • Don’t forget a 30-day supply of over the counter and prescription medicines and any medical equipment or supplies that you might need! Some health plans allow for a 90-day refill on prescription medications. Consider discussing this option with your healthcare provider. Make a photocopy of prescriptions, as this may help in obtaining medications in an emergency situation. 


 

I’m testing positive for COVID. What are my treatment options?

Since early 2020, we’ve all collectively struggled through the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve heard a lot of medical terms when it comes to COVID-19 – including surge, variant, MRNA vaccines, etc. – but there’s one term we’re only starting to become familiar with when it comes to COVID: treatment. 

 

Now, if you test positive and are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19, treatments are available that can reduce your chances of being hospitalized or dying from the disease. If you are worried about your symptoms, this Coronavirus Self-Checker can help you decide when to seek care.

COVID treatments…

  • Must be prescribed by a healthcare provider

  • Must be started as soon as possible after diagnosis to be effective

  • May have side effects or interact with other medications you are taking (be sure to discuss this with your doctor) 

  • Are available at home and in outpatient settings

 

If you test positive for COVID, you can find treatment by:

  1. Calling a healthcare provider

  2. Using the Test To Treat tool to find a testing location that can provide treatment

  3. Calling 1-800-232-0233 (TTY 1-888-720-7489) to find a testing location that can provide treatment

Types of COVID Treatments

You can treat the symptoms of COVID to help you feel better with over-the-counter medicines, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil). 

To treat the COVID virus itself, there are two types of treatment options: antiviral treatments and monoclonal antibodies, which work in different ways.

COVID treatment graphic.jpeg

Antiviral treatments target specific parts of the virus to stop it from multiplying in the body. This reduces the amount of the virus in your body, so you may not get as sick or need to go to the hospital.

  • What antiviral treatments are available?

    • Paxlovid

      • For people 12 years and older

      • Taken at home by mouth (orally)

      • Must begin within 5 days of when your symptoms start

    • Lagevrio

      • For people 18 years and older

      • Taken at home by mouth (orally)

      • Must begin within 5 days of when your symptoms start

    • Veklury

      • Used for adults and children.

      • Intravenous (IV) infusions at a healthcare facility for 3 consecutive days

      • Must begin within 7 days of when your symptoms start
         

Monoclonal antibodies help boost your body’s ability to fight COVID-19. They may be more or less effective against different variants of the virus that causes COVID-19.

What monoclonal antibody treatments are available?

  • Bebtelovimab

    • For people 12 years and older

    • Single IV injection

    • Must begin within 7 days of when your symptoms start

Don’t delay! Call a healthcare provider to discuss treatment options right away, even if your symptoms are only mild right now. Treatment must be started within days after you first develop symptoms to be effective.